CBCS11: Reading Fandry

After watching the Marathi film Fandry, here is a very short reading – may be useful in getting another view. It’s free online.

Jadhav, Shrikant. ‘Bakha’ in Mulk Raj Anand’s Untouchable and ‘Jabya’ in Nagraj Manjule’s Fandry as Untouchable Characters : A Comparative Analysis.

http://www.epitomejournals.com, Vol. I, Issue III, July 2015, ISSN: 2395-6968

Rio wins the battle for all screens

For a week, the Olympics dominated TV, Twitter and Facebook with viewers watching and then talking it up on social media

Urvi Malvania  |  Mumbai  August 25, 2016

Viewers went all thumbs out for the Olympics, watching into the late hours on television and then posting and tweeting about it for days, going by the numbers that have just come in from BARC and social media platforms Twitter and Facebook. According to BARC data, Star Sports 3 beat its nearest rival Ten Sports by a huge margin. Facebook said, across the globe, 277 million people had 1.5 billion interactions related to the Olympic Games and among Indian athletes, the photograph of hockey player Poonam Malik with wrestler Sakshi Malik was the most talked about moment. On Twitter, over 187 …

http://www.business-standard.com/article/management/rio-wins-the-battle-for-all-screens-116082501206_1.html

Tata Sky logs into the video revolution

Ten years after its launch, the company is putting the edge on its product, in a bid to keep customers engaged and loyal

Urvi Malvania  |  Mumbai  August 22, 2016

The positioning remains unchanged says Harit Nagpal, CEO at Tata Sky as he leans forward to explain how the brand has grown in the ten years since it made its first public appearance. It has always been about service. “We operate in a highly commoditised sector. Nothing is exclusive – the content, distribution methods and technology all are available to everyone. The pricing also is a challenge as it is not so much governed by what my consumers can pay, but by what the competition is charging. So it leaves us….

http://www.business-standard.com/article/management/tata-sky-logs-into-the-video-revolution-116082201263_1.html

BBC’s 100 greatest films of 21st century

“They don’t make ‘em like they used to.”

How often have we all heard that resigned expression? How often have we said it ourselves? ‘The death of cinema’ is debated in university film studies programs worldwide. Critics lament the loss of ‘small movies’ in favour of superhero spectacles. Box-office analysts look for signs of an industry on the brink. Studio executives fear that video-on-demand may destroy the idea of going to the cinema more than broadcast and cable TV ever did.

And what can we really call a new classic? What in recent vintage can hold its own on the big screen with the likes of The Searchers, The Godfather, The Rules of the Game, Seven Samurai or Citizen Kane? Some film journalists even think the movie star is a thing of the past.

Perhaps the fault lies not in our movie stars, but in ourselves. If you can’t find masterpieces amid the blockbuster flotsam, you simply aren’t looking hard enough. Film-making today, whether massively expensive or made with tiny budgets, shot on celluloid or video, is thriving artistically as much as it ever has. But today you’ll find greater diversity in the kinds of films being made, if not in the people who are making them. That’s why…

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20160819-the-21st-centurys-100-greatest-films

CBCS 11: Indian Cinema Reflects on Caste Discriminations

To our Indian Cine-buffs,
We continue with Marathi Cinema besides the discussions surrounding films screened, and  more importantly the reading material.
Our next two films to follow are: (bothare available on youtube with English subtitles)
1) Fandry (Nagaraj Manjule, Marathi, 2013), https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=308yXNMJ1rM,
and
2) Bhavni Bhavai (Ketan Mehta, Gujarati, 1980 (the man who made Manjhi!) –

Some material for reading follows.
Happy viewing, happier reading.

Drinking milk from non-Indian cows ‘could make children turn to crime’

India’s middle class gated communities should keep their own cow herds with cows from India, Shankar Lal, leader of an influential Hindu nationalist group, says

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Milk from Jersey cows may make children turn to crime, allegedly

Milk from Jersey cows may make children turn to crime, allegedly Photo: Alamy
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If you thought Indian-bred cows are mothers, would you concede that high-quality foreign cows like milky Jersey could be ‘Mausi‘s (maternal-aunt)? You may be logical, but definitely anti-national, if you follow the right-wing Hindu fundamentalist arguments.

And after all, the arguments come not from mavericks like me; they come from some of the top Hindu organisation leaders. According to Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (National Volunteer Association, the parent of all those hundreds of right associations -RSS or Sangh Parivar)’s Gau Rakshak Samithi/ Cow Protection Committee chief Shankar Lal believes only Indian cows are mothers. And others are unfit for our children to drink their milk from! If Indian children drink the foreign cows’ (like Jersey cows) milk, they will turn to criminal tendencies/ behaviour. Brilliant science by the extreme organisations’ leaders.

This type of logic is nothing new. Not long ago did our prime minister, RSS’ own prodigy Narendra Modi, claimed that the plastic surgery was invented by Indian’s. For example, that is how Lord Ganesha, the elephant-headed god, got his elephant trunk! Period! This is just one of the many “brilliant” example!

Fine, all credit to the extremist (I mean creative) organisations. Others simply can’t think out of the box. Now, what to do with our “high-breed” and “high-milk producing”) but low-dignity Jersey cows? Many Indian households have already bought them for better milk production and profit. Today our dairy industry runs because of them, just like our beef-export industry. Can we sell for slaughter these low-dignity cows (which -unlike our pure, vegetarian Indian cows!- eat plastic and all the filth in our streets- as accused by the brilliant-thinking RIGHT organisation) and export for some foreign exchange? This will continue our number one ranking as beef-exporters and ensure that our kids have saatvik/ saadhu/ polite, sober mentalities and behaviour.

After this, India won’t have any more crimes  like Delhi gang-rape (and regular rapes that keep happening in our hearing/ seeing on TVs/ reading) or rape of nuns in Jhabua in Madhya Pradesh (1998); there won’t be anything like Gujarat pogrom (2002) or Muzaffarpur (in Uttar Pradesh) lynching of Mohammad Aqlaq (2015); or train blasts like Samjauta Express (2007) and Dy. Police Inspector Kallappa Handibag killing in Karnataka (2016); there won’t be unprovoked Church attacks as in Karnataka (2008) or attacks on helpless tribal Christians as in Orissa and rape of nuns (2008); with the downgrading of foreign cows, there won’t be any more live burning of missionaries like Australian Graham Steines (who was working for the leprosy patients in Orissa- with his two sons Philip (10) and Timothy (6) while they were sleeping in a jeep (Jan. 1999) and many other killings.

How blessed we will be, just because of these low-dignity, undeserving, dirty Jersey cows! And because of brilliant “Right”-thinkers of the Sangh Parivar! I am waiting for that day when there will be no more crime in India; no attacks, no abuses, no discord, no conspiracies, no communal flare-up – just one remedy: strip these Jersey cows of all their dignity and “high-breed status”, and all will be fine. Tell them: they should know that they are downgraded and unwanted. These foreign cows should feel humiliated. Thank you high-breed cows for giving us all our Right behaviour and our cows much-awaited dignity!

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you may like to read what the British paper The Telegraph writes about:-

The Jersey cow may seem like a cute symbol of the British countryside, but according to Hindu nationalists in India it is a demonic creature and the cause of juvenile crime.

The claim was made by a leading figure in the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS), the influential Hindu nationalist group which counts Narendra Modi, the prime minister, among its members. Mr Modi was educated by the group….

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/india/11561612/Drinking-milk-from-non-Indian-cows-could-make-children-turn-to-crime.html

CBCS10: Manji the Mountain Man

Manjhi the Mountain Man (2015; directed by Ketan Mehta)

Starring Nawazuddin Siddiqui & Radhika Apte.

Recommended synopsis: http://www.hindustantimes.com/movie-reviews/manjhi-the-mountain-man-review-an-inspiring-touching-tale-of-a-common-man/story-gP1bTd7Nn6UckvJofm0oRP.html

Mandatory Reading material:

Naaz, Farhana & Mandal, Mohosin. Dalits in Bollywood: From Endurance to Resistance – A Historical Approach.Lapis Lazuli -An International Literary Journal. Accessed 19 Aug. 2016. http://pintersociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Naaz-Farhana-13.pdf

Outlook magazine allegedly removes editor-in-chief Krishna Prasad days after magazine carried expose on RSS

Outlook magazine allegedly removes editor-in-chief Krishna Prasad days after magazine carried expose on RSS

Unable to Keep Up With the Din of Daily News, Rajdeep Sardesai Tries To Reinvent Himself

By Sandeep Bhushan | 10 August 2016

It was not a scene one is used to seeing: the journalist Rajdeep Sardesai loudly gushing “fantastico!” each time a school student correctly answered a question. The exclamation “fantastico,” one realised during the course of the one-hour quiz show, was the advertising tag line of a car being launched by its sponsor, the Tata group. Sardesai is the quizmaster of News Wiz, which started on 24 July 2016, and is aired on India Today TV.

At the peak of his career, this avatar of the renowned anchor would have been unthinkable.

Is brand Sardesai on the cusp of change, I asked him. Sardesai did not deny it, but did not seem unduly worried either. “I am only re-inventing myself,” he said. “My core competence remains news. Even this quiz show that I am doing is based on news. It will create a culture of news sorely lacking today.” But… (click for more)

Unable to Keep Up With the Din of Daily News, Rajdeep Sardesai Tries To Reinvent Himself

How a Brahmin-Only Township Was Allowed in 21st Century Karnataka

A township strictly meant for Brahmins claims to revive the “lost traditions” of the Brahmin community. The architecture, the lifestyle and culture will ensure a “Brahmanic way of life.”

Welcome to The Vedic Village- Shankar Agraharam, a ‘Brahmin only’ housing project that was planned in the outskirts of Bengaluru in…

http://www.thequint.com/india/2016/08/03/how-a-brahmin-only-township-was-allowed-in-21st-century-karnataka