Dublin Museum, Spire and River

06 Aug.  The second day in Dublin was another day of education. It started with Fr Hugh Duffy SJ, professor of English (Emiretus), at University College of Dublin, sharing with me a part of his profound knowledge of English and Irish, British history. How wonderful it was to hear (some of it, once again to hear) Gerard Manley Hopkins, Cardinal Newman, Oscar Wilde, James Joyce, and others! And about the struggles for freedom of Ireland from the British. Sound so akin to Indian struggle for Independence.

One of the finest experiences was to spend two days at the house where the poet Gerard Manley Hopkins lived, while teaching at the University College of Dublin! So did Cardinal Newman, when he was the Rector of the UCD for four years! And more, I lived in the room of Scripture Scholar Fr Fogarty SJ! Fr Fogarty has gone on a vacation, and I was lucky enough to occupy that room for two days, in his life time!

The highlight of the day was our visit to Irish National Museum (1877). Below is a photograph of a war-plane kept outside in the courtyard of the Museum:

Image

 

St Francis Xavier church at Gardiner Street, which is run by the Jesuits, who also run a century-and-half old school. The pipe organ on the loft is real huge, filling the entire large loft of the Church!

Image

Image

 

Architecture of Jesus:

Image

And Mother Mary with Child Jesus:

Image

The olden-type confessional:

Image

The city of Dublin, with the spire of St Patrick seen from a distance:

Image

This 121.8 meter tall aluminium Dublin Spire was established on O’Connell Street in 2003.

Image

The Solar revolution, near Jameson’s distillery:

Image

Bridge over River Liffey:

ImageImage

The three-storey Museum, outside view:

ImageImage

The money-changer:

Image

Irish soldiers in various roles, at various junctures of history:

ImageImageImage

Unlike the above soldiers, the photograph below is of real, moving children! I have seen that most kids feel at home in such museums and art galleries, thanks to their mothers (and dads, in some cases). That is how a spirit for its history, tradition, land and culture is nurtured:

Image

(Below:) War tanker used in the Great War

Image

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s